Subject: Colemanballs

Colemanballs:

A term coined by British magazine “Private Eye,” to describe verbal gaffes, errors or misuse of words and phrases spoken by British football (soccer) announcers, coaches or players – initially BBC broadcaster David Coleman and the suffix -balls, as in “to balls up” or make a mistake.

He has all-round, 365 degree vision.

English football player & manager

If ever a goal ever needed a game, this is it.

British football player & broadcaster

Here we see Tevez’s little curly one.

English football player, manager & sports commentator

Barnsley have started off the way they mean to begin.

English football player & commentator

It was a good match, which could have gone either way and very nearly did.

But the ball was going all the way, right away, eventually.

Scottish football player

He’s put on weight and I’ve lost it, and vice versa.

Irish soccer player

If there weren’t such a thing as football, we’d all be frustrated footballers.

English football player & manager

Well Ibrox [Stadium] is filling up slowly, but rapidly.


Don't tell those coming in now the result of that fantastic match. Now let's have another look at Italy's winning goal.

(1926 – ) English sports commentator

Stronsay is an island surrounded by sea.

(1926 – ) English sports commentator

That’s twice now he has got between himself and the goal.

English professional football player & commentator

The opening ceremony was good, although I missed it.

The shot from Laws was precise but wide.

We are really quite lucky this year because Christmas falls on Christmas Day.

English football player

Ian Rush, deadly ten times out of ten, but that wasn't one of them.

English football player

If there are any managers out there with a bottomless pit, I’m sure that they would be interested in these two Russians.

English football player, manager & sports commentator

Even if he had scored for Alaves, it would have made no difference to the scoreline.

Irish football player

He’s very quick for a man of his age. I suppose you’d call him ageless. He’s 33 or 34.

English football player, manager & sports commentator

The difference between right and wrong is often not more than five meters.

Mick McCarthy will have to replace Cascarino because he’s quickly running out of legs.

English football player & announcer













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