Author: Benjamin Franklin

Beware the hobby that eats.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

A dying man can do nothing easily.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Why should I give my readers bad lines of my own when good ones of other people’s are so plenty?

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

I didn't fail the test, I just found 100 ways to do it wrong.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

In this world nothing is certain but death and taxes.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

There are three faithful friends, an old wife, an old dog, and ready money.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

I am in the prime of senility.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, and half-shut afterwards.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

He was so learned that he could name a horse in nine languages; so ignorant that he bought a cow to ride on.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Creditors have better memories than debtors.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Death takes no bribes.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

I know not which lives more unnatural lives, obeying husbands, or commanding wives.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

The first mistake in public business is going into it.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

There are more old drunkards than old doctors.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

A flatterer never seems absurd: the flatter’d always takes his word.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Never argue with a man who buys his ink by the barrel.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

One good husband is worth two good wives for the scarcer things are, the more they’re valued.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

He’s a fool that makes his doctor his heir.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

If your head is wax, don't walk in the sun.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Three may keep a secret… if two of them are dead.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor
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