Author: Benjamin Franklin

Marry your son when you will, but your daughter when you can.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

I am in the prime of senility.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

One good husband is worth two good wives for the scarcer things are, the more they’re valued.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

He’s a fool that makes his doctor his heir.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Love thy neighbor… but don't pull down your hedge.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

We must all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang separately.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Why should I give my readers bad lines of my own when good ones of other people’s are so plenty?

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Death takes no bribes.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

He that falls in love with himself will have no rivals.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

He that lies down with dogs, shall rise up with fleas.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, and half-shut afterwards.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Rich widows are the only secondhand goods that sell at first-class prices.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

There are more old drunkards than old doctors.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Fish and visitors smell in three days.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

The first mistake in public business is going into it.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor

Never argue with a man who buys his ink by the barrel.

(1706 – 1790) American statesman, author, scientist & inventor













Help children living with autism with one click. The Autism Site