Author: Casey Stengel

He (Gil Hodges) fields better on one leg than anybody else I got on two.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Managing is getting paid for home runs someone else hits.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

I don’t know if he throws a spitball but he sure spits on the ball.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

You have to have a catcher because if you don’t you’re likely to have a lot of passed balls.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

There comes a time in every man’s life… and I’ve had many of them.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Ability is the art of getting credit for all the home runs somebody else hits.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

It's wonderful to meet so many friends that I didn't used to like.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

I couldn't done it without my players.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Now there’s three things you can do in a baseball game; you can win or you can lose or it can rain.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

If we're going to win the pennant, we've got to start thinking we're not as good as we think we are.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

The key to being a good manager is keeping the people who hate me away from those who are still undecided.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Even my players aren't players.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

I've got a tip on the market for you fellows, buy Pennsylvania Railroad – because by tomorrow night about a dozen of you bums will be riding on it.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Look at him (Bobby Richardson) – he doesn’t drink, he doesn’t smoke, he doesn’t chew, he doesn’t stay out late, and he still can’t hit .250.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Two hundred million Americans, and there ain’t two good catchers among ‘em.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Stengel: Well, I have given that thought a lot of thinking lately and last night… well – I finally made up my mind.

Reporter: Which way?

Stengel: I made up my mind both ways.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

My health is good enough about the shoulders.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

It’s wonderful to meet so many friends that I didn’t used to like.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

Old-timers weekends, and airplane landings are alike; if you can walk away from them, they’re successful.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

I was not successful as a ball player, as it was a game of skill.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager

The trouble is not that players have sex the night before a game, it’s that they stay out all night looking for it.

(1890 – 1975) American baseball manager